Who Said the U.S. is Not the Most Corrupt Country in the World?
Posted Dec 5, 2010

Who Said the U.S. is Not the Most Corrupt Country in the World?


by Dr. Robert D. Crane  


  Now we know that the Afghanis and Saudis are neophytes when it comes to corruption.  In America we legalize it, so no-one can object.


  U.S. Senator Bernie Sanders, recently elected as an Independent from Vermont (the only person in fifty years to enter the Senate as an independent) introduced an amendment to the Wall Street reform bill last year requiring the Federal Reserve Bank to reveal the beneficiaries of bailouts.  Wednesday, November 8th, the Fed’s website revealed that the bailouts amounted to three trillion dollars to the biggest banks and businesses, not the hundreds of billions previously made public, at a time when this same bailout could have been used to address the needs of ordinary citizens and the small businesses that have always been the source of most of the jobs in America.


  The problem is not corrupt people but corrupt institutions.  Institutional change is necessary so that the incentives to legal corruption are reduced or removed.  Monopoly power, both economic and political, through funny money is a crime against humanity.  We don’t need to abolish the Fed, as many increasingly insist, but rather to reform it through “capital homesteading”, as advocated by the American Revolutionary Party, http://www.americanrevolutionaryparty.us  .

  Without just institutions, freedom and democracy will always be used as a form of intellectual opium, such as “democratic capitalism”, offered precisely by those who are most skilled in memetic warfare to delude even their own followers.

  According to the hadith, the core nature of the Anti-Christ, the massiah al dajjal, is to reverse truth and falsehood.  As a person or a system (take your pick) he (it) will offer you water and say it is fire, and then will offer you fire and say it is water.  What better way to corrupt the dignity of universal private property ownership through interest-free pure credit limited to investment in real production, as well as through the free market and competition as the only way to establish value and balance in production and consumption. 

  Introducing ethics into business is great talk and necessary, but this is sheer delusion, both economic and political, unless we introduce systemic change in money and banking as the most reliable means to peace, prosperity, and freedom through justice. 


SEE ALSO:  A real jaw dropper at the Federal Reserve, Bernie Sanders http://mwcnews.net/focus/politics/7054-federal-reserve.html