Gerges, Fawaz

Fawaz A. Gerges earned an M.Sci., London School of Economics and a D.Phil., Oxford University. He holds the Christian A. Johnson Chair in International Affairs and Middle Eastern Studies. Senior analyst and regular commentator for ABC Television News. He is also a commentator for “Morning Edition,” NPR. He appeared on many television and radio networks throughout the world, including CNN, CBS, NPR, the BBC and, Al Jazeera. Taught at Oxford, Harvard, and Columbia universities and was a research fellow at Princeton University for two years. Has won several academic awards, one of which is an 18-month MacArthur fellowship. Special interests: Islam and the political process, fringe Islamist (jihadist) movements, Arab politics, American foreign policy in the Middle East, the modern history of the Middle East, history of conflict, diplomacy and foreign policy, historical sociology, and international relations. Spent several years conducting field research on relations between the Islamists, jihadists and the West, particularly the United States, in several Middle Eastern countries. Author of the forthcoming: The Jihadis: Unholy Warriors (Harcourt Press, fall 2005), and The Road to 9/11 (Cambridge University Press, Sept. 2005). His books include the following: America and Political Islam: Clash of Interests or Clash of Cultures? (Cambridge University Press, 1999); The Superpowers and the Middle East: Regional and International Politics, 1955-1967 (Oxford and Westview Press, 1994); and The Clinton Administration’s Approach Toward Islamist Movements (The Council on Foreign Relations: New York, 1999). Articles and essays have appeared in Foreign Affairs, Foreign Policy, Survival, The New York Times, The Washington Post, The Los Angeles Times, The Christian Science Monitor, The International Herald Tribune, The Baltimore Sun, The Nation, Harvard Journal of World Affairs, The Oxford International Review, British Journal of Middle Eastern Studies, The Middle East Journal, The Beirut Review, Al-Mustaqbal Al-Arabi, Al Hayat, Al-Safir, Al-Nahar, Al-Mustaqbal, and in other journals and anthologies.

From http://pages.slc.edu/~fgerges/


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